Why Circuit Training keeps up the Pace

In this article, we’ll discuss the ever-popular form of exercise that is Circuit Training and why it’s still a major mover from gym-to-gym and park-to-park.

Thanks for taking time out from your busy life to read what I hope will inspire and motivate you on your fitness/health journey. My name’s Hanif and I’m a Fitness Instructor, Nutritional Adviser and I’m currently furthering my knowledge as a Personal Trainer.

If you’ve got a gym membership and have already found yourself to the gym since they resumed on the 25th July then, well done. If you’ve not been in yet or don’t have a membership but want to get training then, let me say a few words to help you get in there.

Some people won’t let up or give in. During this whole Covid-19 issue I’ve seen soo many people killin’ it in the local park and it was encouraging to see families, men and women taking the time to stay active. I noticed groups of people and sole individuals working out and I was impressed by the dedication many of the people in the local community place on staying fit and healthy.

“Maybe it was down to good coaching, a feeling of inclusion, the price they paid to be in the group…”

Before Covid-19 happened I was looking at the next few course modules I’d pick for my Personal Training Learning and Circuit Training won me over just from me seeing how happy and motivated the people were that I’d seen in the park. Maybe it was down to good coaching, a feeling of inclusion, the price they paid to be in the group…I have no idea but it was motivating enough for me to share this.

Circuit Training was first developed by R.E. Morgan and G.T. Anderson in 1953 at the University of Leeds, to allow exercise participants to work out at their own pace whilst gaining the benefits of working out with other people.

Example Circuit.

Circuit Training has different definitions to that of the 1950s but the core aspects are still in place. As a basic breakdown, it is…

“several carefully selected exercises arranged consecutively.” 

This form of training is very popular today, even with army forces because strength, agility, endurance, balance and coordination can all be put out there for your training partners to see. That’s right, you may feel uncomfortable at first doing this kind of training but if situated with likeminded individuals and with a focus of why you’re training, there’s no need to be sad over anything.

What makes Circuit training so good for your body is that you can combine strength gains with cardiovascular endurance which will generate better health throughout your body. Also, you don’t need to be in an enclosed environment – you can train in the park, a car park, on the beach the list goes on. But if muscular development is what you’re after then strength training doing a gym circuit is a great way to go.

Many forms of training are fighting for your attention from the Peloton movement, F45 and CrossFit, many of them utilising the simplicity of circuits. It’s the ease of circuits that keep this form of training going. I will inshaAllah (God willing) be aiming to set-up circuit training sessions for men in the local area. It’s fun, builds a community spirit, adaptable to every individual and capable of helping anyone reach the health and fitness goals their shooting for.

If you benefitted from this post, have questions or would like more information on this form of training and when I’ll be teaching, drop a message [Here] and I will be in touch.

Related articles:

https://criterionfit.com/2020/07/03/what-are-sedentary-and-healthy-lifestyles/

https://criterionfit.com/2020/06/24/core-strength-a-routine-for-stamina/

https://criterionfit.com/2020/06/11/is-strength-training-for-you/

https://criterionfit.com/2020/05/04/20-minute-workout-with-the-basics-only/

https://criterionfit.com/2020/03/13/my-top-5-sculpting-exercises-to-do-every-morning-to-build-a-strong-and-balanced-body/

https://www.coachmag.co.uk/tags/circuit-training

Images found via google images, they are not my own.

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